What to Expect at an Administrative Hearing

Health care providers are accustomed to helping those in need, but when they receive a complaint letter from the New Jersey State Board of Medical Examiners, they become the ones in need of help.

In most states, including New Jersey, health care consumers can file complaints with the State Board of Medical Examiners. In New Jersey, the complaints can be filed online.

If the board finds that a complaint merits further investigation, it sends a notice of hearing to the health care provider. The notice must include the time and place of the hearing, and give the provider 35 days to respond to the allegations. The provider has a right to know the allegations in the complaint. The answer to be complaint must admit or deny each allegation.

If the provider fails to file an answer or appear at the hearing, a default judgment could be entered against the provider. Hearings take place in front of one of the directors of the board. No more than 45 days later, the board will issue a decision. Possible penalties include license suspension or revocation and restitution to patients.

What’s more, the board’s finding is recorded in the National Practitioner Data Bank, an online clearinghouse maintained by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. Prospective patients can use the database to check whether a practitioner has been the subject of any disciplinary actions.

Our firm has successfully defended providers before the New Jersey State Board of Medical Examiners, the New Jersey State Board of Chiropractic Examiners, the New Jersey Board of Nursing, the New Jersey Board of Pharmacy, the New Jersey State Board of Physical Therapy Examiners, the New Jersey State Board of Dentistry, the New Jersey State Board of Social Work Examiners, the New York State Office of Professional Discipline and more.

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Posted in: Dispute Resolution & Professional License Defense